Update: December 28, 2018

LARRY LOYIE: Bibliography

With Constance Brissenden

www.firstnationswriter.com

All books available from www.goodminds.com

Bestselling books by Larry Loyie (1933-2016) about traditional Indigenous childhood and family life, and the effect of residential school:

Residential Schools, With the Words and Images of Survivors, A National History (Indigenous Education Press/Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, 2014; second printing 2016; third printing 2018) by Larry Loyie with Wayne K. Spear and Constance Brissenden. A bestselling, accessible, comprehensive national history of the Canadian residential school system, with survivor interviews, more than 120 historic photographs and ephemera. Hardcover, full colour, 112 pages. Winner of the Golden Oak Award. Available from www.goodminds.com.

iBOOK (available through iTunes books): Residential Schools, With the Words and Images of Survivors (Indigenous Education Press, 2015) by Larry Loyie with Wayne K. Spear and Constance Brissenden. A national history of the Canadian residential school system, with additional video, audio, photographic, informational, and other enhancements.

Two Plays About Residential School (Indigenous Education Press, 2018). Updated 20th anniversary edition of two groundbreaking plays about residential school and its aftermath. Includes Ora Pro Nobis, Pray for Us by Larry Loyiea full-length play about his years in residential school and the friendship of the boys that helped him survive. Performed in British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario. Directed by Constance Brissenden. Published with Vera Manuel’s powerful full-length play The Strength of Indian Women, staged in Canada and the United States, about the aftermath of residential school on a group of women survivors and their descendants. Edited by Constance Brissenden. Available from www.goodminds.com.

As Long as the Rivers Flow by Larry Loyie with Constance Brissenden, illustrations by Heather D. Holmlund (Groundwood, 2002). Larry Loyie’s last summer at the age of nine in a traditional First Nations setting before residential school. Winner of the 2003 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction; 2006 Honour Book, First Nation Communities Read Award; Finalist 2006 Golden Oak and Rocky Mountain Book awards. The first book in the Lawrence Series. A groundbreaking classic.

Tant que couleront les rivieres, French edition of As Long as the Rivers Flow, available with original illustrations by Heather D. Holmlund, from Editions Des Plaines, Manitoba. Third printing, 2018.

Goodbye Buffalo Bay, A true story of life in a residential school…and of moving on (Theytus, 2008, multiple reprints) by Larry Loyie with Constance Brissenden. The sequel to As Long as the Rivers Flow. A youth chapter book. Thirteen-year-old Lawrence in his last tumultuous year at residential school, followed by his first few years as a child worker. As the Cree boy searches for his identity after residential school, he feels pride in his abilities. A bestselling book used in countless classrooms (grade 5 to college level). The third book in the Lawrence Series.

Two Plays About Residential School (Living Traditions, 1998). Original publication of Ora Pro Nobis, Pray for Us by Larry Loyie and The Strength of Indian Women by Vera Manuel. Reprinted in an updated version, Indigenous Education Press, 2018.

The Healing, a Memoir for Four Voices by Larry Loyie (Living Traditions Writers Group, 1996). A play for four voices, performed more than 60 times (directed by Constance Brissenden), shares Larry Loyie’s experience and loss as a traditional Cree child in residential school and his healing journey as an adult. Available from Constance Brissenden, email: firstnationswriter@gmail.com

Other books by Larry Loyie about his traditional Indigenous childhood and family life:

When the Spirits Dance, A Cree Boy’s Search for the Meaning of War by Larry Loyie with Constance Brissenden, with historic and modern photos (Theytus, 2006). The second children’s book in the Lawrence Series. The Second World War brings dramatic changes to a First Nation’s boy’s life when his father is sent overseas. Finalist 2006 Anskohk Aboriginal Writers Festival.

The Moon Speaks Cree, A Winter Adventure (Theytus, 2012) by Larry Loyie with Constance Brissenden. An illustrated children’s book. Winter brings adventures to seven-year-old Lawrence and his Cree family living in a traditional forest setting. He discovers something about his grandfather’s skill as a fiddler that makes him think deeply of the past. The fourth book in the Lawrence Series.

Other titles by Larry Loyie:

Welcome to the Circle (Pearson Canada, 2014) by Larry Loyie with Constance Brissenden. The circle in Cree and other aboriginal cultures promotes inclusiveness, pride, and mental wellness. Written for elementary school students’ wellness programs.

The Gathering Tree by Larry Loyie with Constance Brissenden, illustrations by Heather D. Holmlund (Theytus, 2005). Gently told, the story of a First Nations family facing the issue of HIV. Includes teaching materials. Ages 9 years and up. Chosen for presentation at 2006 AIDS International Conference, Toronto. Winner of Moonbeam Children’s Book Award (USA), Silver Medal, Health Category 2012.

Additional Works:

Away from Home: American Indian Boarding School Experiences, 1979-2000. Edited by Margaret L. Archuleta, Brenda J. Child and K. Tsianina Lomawaima. Published by Heard Museum, Phoenix, Arizona, 2000. Includes excerpts from Larry Loyie’s play Ora Pro Nobis, Pray for Us.

The Greater Vancouver BookFirst Nations People” by Larry Loyie, an essay on First Nations people in Vancouver area (Linkman Press, Vancouver, 2000).

The Wind Cannot Read Larry Loyie, co-editor. An anthology of learners writing (Province of British Columbia Ministry of Advanced Education, Training and Technology, 1992). Larry was the carrier of the B.C. Book during International Literacy Year 1990. He traveled across the province collecting learners’ writings for The Wind Cannot Read. In 2001, Larry received the Canada Post Award for Individual Achievement (B.C.) for his efforts and progress in returning to school as a learner and pursuing his dream of becoming a writer.

In Progress, Wild Waters, the story of Toma, Voyageur. Larry Loyie’s four times great grandfather, Toma, was an Iroquois voyageur with George Simpson, Governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company. This novel is based on a true account of a disastrous canoe trip together in 1828 from York Factory across the far north to the Pacific and how it changed the future of the 18-year-old Iroquois youth.

Many newspaper and magazine articles, keynote speeches, and presentations on subjects including traditional indigenous life, residential schools, the fur trade, Aboriginal veterans, the aboriginal publishing industry, the elders way of teaching, writing basics, from self to story writing workshop, and other topics.

From Self to Story (The Word on the Street Toronto, 2004). Stories by Toronto adult literacy learners, including writing from two workshops by Larry Loyie and Constance Brissenden. The title is inspired by the title of their writing workshops.

Acimowina Storytelling (Learning at the Centre Press, 2000) Cree stories from student writers, many written in creative writing classes with Larry Loyie and Constance Brissenden.

Honouring Time: A 15-month Aboriginal Day-timer (Ningwake Learning Press & TransCanada, 2001). Featuring First Nations writers and artists, including Larry Loyie.

Learning about Participatory Approaches in Adult Literacy Education (Learning at the Centre Press). Six teachers talk about their experiences; includes an overview of creative writing workshops by Larry Loyie and Constance Brissenden.